ON WRITING

“It’s very easy to quit during the first ten years of writing. Nobody cares whether you write or not, and it’s very hard to write when nobody cares one way or the other. You can’t get fired if you don’t write, and most of the time you don’t get rewarded if you do. But don’t quit.” Andre Dubus

Tuesday, 20 September 2011

Social Media - let the editor speak. And a little on queries...



Following on from my Twitter post below, which resulted in some little controversy here and there (not that that's a bad thing!) I thought I'd do what I've been trying to do for sometime - write a short post. This one is a quote I came across today while I was working in the State Library and browsing Writer's Digest magazines.

ON SOCIAL MEDIA:

I like it when an author is Internet savvy. The future of books is digital, so it is a good idea to begin to use that medium as much as possible for promotional purposes now, and to join the pioneers of this movement who are scheduling blog tours, updating websites and connecting with others in and out of the writing community via the Internet. Perhaps most importantly, I think that those online efforts don't go unnoticed by publishers!

Adriana Dominguez
Executive Editor @ HarperCollins Children's Books
Check her out: Full Circle: fullcircleliterary.com/Submissions.htm


ON QUERIES

Adriana says:

Most queries are...too long. Send 3 - 4 paragraphs.
1 short paragraph telling why you chose her agency (she likes to see you've done your homework.)
1 or 2 paragraphs that succinctly describe your project and highlight its potential in the marketplace (homework.)
Final paragraph - your background, education, credits and platform.

  • What do you think? Do you think internet promotion works? 
  • How else will authors market their e-books?




24 comments:

  1. I hope internet promotion works or what have I been doing all this time! ;) But that aside, I love her formula for queries. Great post.

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  2. I think internet promotion must work, or surely nobody would bother with it for any book beyond their first? The very fact that one of the things the editor asks for in the query letter is platform details is quite telling.

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  3. I think success without a lot of internet presence is like winning the lottery. It happens, and can happen big, but it takes a whole series of coincidences (the exact right book at the right time featured by the right people). Everyone ELSE needs the internet promo. And I absolutely think it works, but i think each person has to figure out on he own how it works for her. We each have strengths and weaknesses. I'm really content with blogging and facebook (and all those writing events like ABNA and NaNo) but am pretty much a Twit. I will use it as a supplement, but it will never be my tool of choice.

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  4. Hi I decided to visit all, well most, of the Bloggers who follow my blog to say hi; hello!
    Click here for Bazza’s Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

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  5. Whether we like it or not, as writers we have to be in the field trying to see what works best for us in promoting our work. We might enjoy connecting and networking, but it's also a continuous learning experience.

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  6. Kiersten White is evidence that internet marketing works wonders! Her books have both made it onto the New York Times Bestsellers list. And she did a great deal of networking on the web.

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  7. I'm still working on learning how to use sites like Twitter - it's very easy for me to get caught up in hashtag games and such, when I should be doing other things. One thing of which I have availed myself - several scheduled "chat" groups which meet on a particular day to discuss various topics. There are groups for literature, sci-fi writing, marketing, you name it. Sometimes I join in, sometimes I just watch the conversation, but I usually learn something and meet at least 2-3 other like-minded people to follow.

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  8. I always freeze at the query process. It's the one part of writing that I dread and fear. I don't know why. I guess I always feel out of my element when I sit down to query. It's a fear I hope to conquer soon.

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  9. I think it works!
    And my query was just three paragraphs. Short ones.

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  10. Hi guys. Looks like there's a general agreement that internet marketing is here to stay. Thanks for coming by and commenting.

    Denise

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  11. I think internet savvy is a very good thing in this day and age. We have to promote, in one way or another, and being comfortable with social media helps a ton.

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  12. Hi, Denise,

    Add my yes. I definitely think it helps. Today I researched agents for my novel and it seems most of them are asking for the three paragraph structure. My issue with this is what if you have no credits, What do you do for that third paragraph?

    Any suggestions.

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  13. Michael, don't undersell yourself. Publishing your intriguing series during A - Z (and it was very good) is a credit. Your short story was shortlisted, you're a networker/blogger, just think outside the square! I'll be emailing you soon.

    Denise

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  14. I definitely think it works! Both made books made it into the top 100 on Amazon UK on their release days -- all down to lovely bloggy friends and Twitter pals!

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  15. Of course internet promotion works!

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  16. I think the internet is a great tool for any business - if you know how to use it.

    Great query tips. I stick pretty close to that list.

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  17. I think Internet savvy is second only to writing a great story. I think the pushback comes when people think they have to do EVERYTHING - Twitter, Facebook, blogging, podcasts, Google+, blog tours, websites, etc.

    You don't need to do everything. You just need to do some things - the things that work well for you and speak to you - and do them well.

    I can't imagine finally getting a book out there and then not doing much to control my own destiny. The Internet gives us a way to take some charge of getting the news out about our work, and that is a great thing!

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  18. Hi Denise
    Internet promotion is very important. Blog tours are great, but the wise author will do more to bring the book to readers. This is the great struggle of self publishing. Once you're discovered, I think it is not so difficult.

    I have good internet service now. Yeah! Nancy
    N. R. Williams, The Treasures of Carmelidrium

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  19. Some wise words from those in the know here. Thanks Talli, Julie, Nancy, Tara and Lisa. You've obviously found what works for you!

    Denise

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  20. Great post, Denise! Took note of the four suggestions listed.

    I think internet promotion works. Problem is, I'm not savvy at how to go about it. Second problem is, I'm time-challenged.

    Hope to have a romantic entry in a week or two, once I get Remy off to school!! (Amazon)

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  21. Yes, yes and yes! In the last few years, I've found most new authors online. I don't think you have to have an excessive presence (everyone to their own) but you must have a spot where readers can find you and at least one place where they can communicate with you

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  22. Kittie: Looking so forward to your romantic story. Missed you. Hope you're okay now.

    Claire: Me too. Internet is great.

    Denise

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  23. I think internet promotion has a lot of potential, but it's the real-life connections that make people actually perk up at a new writer's post.

    The real question is finding the balance between blogging, tweeting, Facebooking, following back - and getting the real writing done too.

    Thanks for some good insight.

    (Visiting via group #53 on the Campaign.)

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